Blog

16
Oct

Is Too Much Information Your Worst Enemy?

When was the last time you complained about dealing with too much information? Chances are, it was in the past week, if not the past day. Information overload not only produces a sense of stress and tension, it prevents us from doing our best work. Research by psychologists Daniel Kahnemann and Amos Tversky has demonstrated that people are unable to

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7
Jul

Decision Making and Expectations

For years, I’ve asked those in my audiences if they tell stories. Predictably most hands go up. Then I ask, “How many of you tell stories that get better every time you tell them?” That gets a sure-fire laugh. Sadly, however, I would argue that many, if not most, of those stories are about a bad experience. Have you ever

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7
Jun

Where’s Your Happiness Set Point?

Why do people sabotage themselves when things get too good? Over the years, all kinds of people have postulated about the reason this happens. My favorite explanation comes from psychologist Marc Schoen, Ph.D., author of the book Your Survival Instinct is Killing You. He writes “Scientists have found that we each have our own happiness “set point,” the genetic and

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15
May

Managing Discomfort is the Key to Success

It is human nature to aspire to greater things. The United States was conceived and built on that principle. Sadly, some of these aspirations are thwarted by circumstances and environment. More often than not, however, we thwart our own aspirations out of poorly informed beliefs. We listen to what others tell us without verifying the accuracy. We follow the rules

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17
Apr

Critical Thinking: The Economy’s “Other” Skills Gap

A lot has been written recently about the skills gap facing today’s economy. Researchers credit several sources for this phenomenon. First, the Baby Boomers will finally retire in droves over the next decade. Second, there has been a diminished interest in the hard sciences, resulting in a deficit of healthcare professionals and scientific researchers. Third, significantly fewer young people are

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25
Mar

A Newsboy’s Lament

When I was a kid, I had a job that no longer exists – a paper route. I had 150 customers. Every afternoon, I would get out of school and rush to a house two blocks away, where I would pick up 150 papers from the local distributor. I would fold them, stack them in a wagon with high slatted sides

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13
Mar

Five Secrets to Navigating Corporate Bureaucracy

Ever had a great solution to a problem you’re dealing with only to find out that there’s a policy that forbids it? How about a practice that is embedded in the corporate culture, but seems to conflict with other practices? Join the club. We all face situations like these. In most cases there was probably a clear reason why the

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6
Mar

Here’s Why Listening Results in Better Decisions

It is said that President Franklin Roosevelt became convinced that most people were so excited to meet him in person that they really didn’t pay attention to what he said. So he tried an experiment. As he greeted guests during a White House reception, he smiled and said to each of them quietly, “I murdered my grandmother yesterday afternoon.” As

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27
Feb

How a Top Leader Organizes Her Time

Recently, I had the opportunity to interview Laurie, the chief operating officer for an organization of 12,000 people. While time management wasn’t our topic, she began to describe how she works as a part of our conversation. “I divide my days into 15 minute chunks,” she said. “I typically work from 8AM to 6PM everyday, so I have 40 chunks

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20
Feb

Stay Interviews from the Millennial Point of View

One of the more recent fads in HR circles has been the so-called stay interview. In other words, meeting with top performers to discuss their concerns and aspirations in an effort to keep them on the job. As the economy gains momentum and the skills gap continues to grow, employee churn is becoming a significant cost. But I have to

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